Arundel Tree Service
                                (410)439-1900

All Aspects Of Tree Care                                                                                                                                                      Maryland Licensed Tree Experts      

Meet A Tree - Blog

Leyland Cypress - Cypressus x leylandii

Posted on August 24, 2018 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

The Leyland Cypress - Cypressus x leylandii is usually in tree form and can be planted as both a specimen and in mass plantings as a living fence or screen.  The Leyland Cypress originated from cultivation as a hybrid between the Alaska Yellow Cedar (C.nootkatensis D.Don) and the Monterey Cypress (C.macrocarpa Hartw.) and is a member of the Cupressaceae or Cypress family. 

Image Citation: John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org

The Leyland Cypress is one of the most popular and diverse ornamental conifers, with a huge variability in it's size, appearance and uses.  The Leyland Cypress can grow as much as 50 ft in a 15 year period and is considered to be a very fast growing speciman.


Image Citation: John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org

The bark is fibrous in texture and gray in color.  The leaves are scalelike ranging in size from 1.5-2.5 mm long, lacking conspicuous glands, waxy underneath with white X shaped marks on the stomata. The Seedcone in many cultivars is sterile, the seed cone when present are globose and 1.5-2 cm in diameter slightly waxy and composed of 4 pairs of woody scales.  


Image Citation: John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org

Cupressaceae or Cypress' in general are monoecious or diocious and either deciduous or evergreen.  Many Genera within the family contain only one single species.  The Cupressaceae or Cypress family was once more wide spread and contained many more members.

Meet more trees and shrubs on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog https://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/" target="_blank">https://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

Kentucky Coffeetree -(Gymnocladus dioicus)

Posted on May 29, 2018 at 2:00 PM Comments comments (1)

The Kentucky Coffeetree -(Gymnocladus dioicus) - is a deciduous medium sized tree with large, coarse, wide hanging pods that are red-brown when ripe. It is best distinguished by it's large leaflets, large flowers, scaly bark and inflated fruit. At maturity it can reach 18-30 m tall and grows in an erect single trunked, with a low branching habit. The crown of the Kentucky Coffeetree is usually narrow or broad, pyramidal or rounded in shape. It is a member of the Fabaceae (Bean) Family and included in the very small Gymnoclaudus genus which only contains 2 species (the other is native to China).


The leaves are large up to 30 inches long, divided into pairs of opposite side stalks with 6-14 oval leaflets on each stalk. The flowers are greenish-white growing in large upright clusters at the ends of each twig. The bark is a reddish brown that becomes gray and irregularly fissured with age. The twigs are stout and reddish brown in color and hairy only when immature. The fruit is a tough, hard, inflated, red to brown woody legume that ranges in size from 15-25 cm long and 4-5 cm broad. Each woody legume contains 4-7 seeds that are hard coated and nearly round in shape.


The Kentucky Coffeetree grows in moist places, floodplains, riverbanks, bases of ravines and valleys. It is found in the Central and Eastern United States from New York and Massachusetts in the North, North Dakota in the West, Georgia, Alabama and Eastern Texas in the South. It is naturalized and planted as an ornamental further East. It grows best in rich, light soils. This species is unusually free of fungus, parasites and insect infestations. It is recorded that early settlers roasted the fruit of the Coffeetree for use as a coffee substitute, this is believed to be a possible origin of it's common name.


More Cool Tree Facts www.ArundelTreeService.com or Follow Us On Our Blog: www.MeetATree.com

Fatwood (Lightwood, Pine Knot, Rich Lighter or Fat Lighter)

Posted on April 2, 2018 at 2:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Fatwood is also known as Lightwood, Pine Knot, Rich Lighter or Fat Lighter originates from the heartwood of Pine trees (Coniferous tree sap). Stumps and Tap root remaining after a tree has fallen or been removed is a good primary source of Fatwood. The heartwood of Pines is impregnated with resins that make them rot resistant and hard. In woods settings Fatwood can also be harvested from the limb intersections and can be used as a firestarter. Most resinous Pines in the United States can produce Fatwood it is most commonly associated with Pinus palustris Longleaf Pine.

 

 

 

Terpene is one of the main components of Fatwood (Coniferous tree sap), it is a viscous liquid and a volatile hydrocarbon. Terpene is highly flammable and is used for both kindling and as a fire starter, even in wet conditions it will burn and maintain a high enough heat to light even larger pieces of wood. When using Fatwood to create tinder one would shave small curls and use them to light larger pieces of tinder, gradually working up to larger pieces of wood until a hot rolling fire is created. It is recommended that Fatwood not be used for cooking as the pitch soaked wood produces an oily sooty smoke that can transfer to foods.

 

 

 

Worldwide there are 100-125 species that can be classified as resinous pine trees around the world. Distributed around the world in various forms, some of those forms include Scots Pine, Siberian Dwarf Pine, Sumatran Pine, Jack Pine, Loblolly Pine and Caribbean Pine. The area with the most naturally distributed diversity in the genus is between Mexico and California. Fatwood can be found anywhere there is a pine tree or even an old pine stump, it is most concentrated and best preserved in stumps.

 

 

 

There are many uses for Fatwood and other resins outside of firestarting. Fatwood is used industrially in the production of turpentine, when fatwood is cooked down in a fire kiln. Steam that vaporizes from the cooking process and becomes a liquid, that liquid becomes turpentine. Cutler's resin is used in the production of knife handles. Resin is used as an ingredient in most nail polishes. Turpentine and Pine Oil are used in many common household chemicals.

 

 

 

For more tree facts or to learn more about the trees in your area visit our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our Meet A Tree Blog https://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/" target="_blank">https://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

 

 

 

 

Moringa oleifera - Miracle Tree

Posted on January 9, 2018 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (4)

Moringa oleifera is the most common of all of the Moringa genus. The Moringa are the only members of the Moringaceae family. Moringa oleifera has many common names such as the Miracle Tree (for the high nutrient content and said healing powers), Horseradish Tree (for the root flavor, often compared to horseradish), Drumstick Tree (for the slender seedpods) , Benoil and Benzoil Tree (for the oils derived from the seeds).

 

 

 

According to tradition in parts of Africa (especially Ghana), the "Miracle Tree" and it's products have been used for generations. The leaves are extremely high in nutrient value and are said to have natural healing powers. The seed pods and leaves are eaten as a vegetable in many native areas and are used as an ingredient in herbal medicines. Not only does the Moringa oleifera's products contain high nutrient values it can also be used for water purification purposes.

 

 

 

This fast growing deciduous tree can reach a height of 32-40 feet with a diameter of just 1.5 feet. The whitish-grey bark is surrounded by a thick cork. The young shoots have purplish or greenish-white hairy bark. The open crown contains drooping, fragile branches and leathery tripinnate leaves. The fragrant flowers are bisexual and contain five unequal yellow-white petals. In cooler regions the flowers only appear once a year in April-June, however in warmer regions with high rainfall they can appear twice a year or even year round. They appear on hairy stalks in spreading clusters that are 10-25 cm long. The fruit occurs in brown three sided capsules containing dark brown seeds winged seeds that are dispersed by wind and water. When cultivated as a crop it is cut back annually to allow the pods and leaved to remain within reach.

 

 

 

The Moringa oleifera is the main focus of Moringa Connect, a program that provides registered farmers with seeds and resulting manure for crop expansion and harvesting purposes. It is also planted as part of the Feed The Future program, Feed The Future is a United States Government Global Hunger & Food Security Initiative that is currently focused in 19 countries. These programs along with the help of volunteers (including Peace Corp Members, Private and Corporate Sectors) allow areas that are otherwise void of reliable / nutritional food sources to be planted with a resource that will continually produce and reproduce to provide nutritional food for generations to come.

 

 

 

To learn more about how you can volunteer or donate to these amazing programs (Moringa Connect or Feed The Future) visit http://moringaconnect.com/ or http://www.feedthefuture.gov/

 

 

 

You can also meet more trees at www.ArundelTreeService.com or Follow Our Blog www.MeetATree.com

Using wood chips in your garden - "Back to Eden Organic Gardening"

Posted on November 6, 2017 at 11:40 AM Comments comments (2)

Ever wonder how freshly ground wood chips can benefit your gardens at home.  Check out this documentary on the benefits of using wood chips in your organic gardens.  Not only to they help provide you with improved soil conditions but they help conserve water.   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rPPUmStKQ4" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rPPUmStKQ4


The Shortleaf Pine - Pinus echinata

Posted on October 26, 2016 at 12:20 AM Comments comments (0)

The Shortleaf Pine - Pinus echinata, is a typical form as far as appearances are concerned. It can be identified by its combination of resin pockets in the bark, short needles and large amounts of small cones that can remain attached to a tree for years at a time. It is a large pine and can reach heights of up to 125-135 feet when fully mature (in the ideal location of course). Native to the United States, it can be found growing in a large variety of soil types from 150-600 m, From Texas and Missouri in the West along the Eastern Seaboard from Florida in the South to New York in the north. The Shortleaf Pine is considered to be somewhat fire resistant, surviving after moderate burns and reseeding itself after severe ones, sometimes even re-sprouting from the base after fire.


 

The Shortleaf Pine is of more importance commercially then most others Pines as it produces a better quality wood. The lumber from the Shortleaf Pine can be used in finer grade applications producing furniture and cabinetry. It is occasionally planted in parks or along roadsides but is not a popular ornamental.


The bark of the Shortleaf Pine is a reddish brown in color, scaly and made up of plates with resin pockets. The leafs are in the form of needles 7-11 cm long and 1mm wide, straight in form, occasionally twisted, gray-yellow or green-yellow in color, occurring in bundles of two.  The pollen cone is 15-20 mm long, yellow-green or purplish green in color.  The seed cone can be solitary or clustered, with great numbers within the crown, symetrical in shape, 4-6 cm long, red to brown in color, sharp prickly points of varying lengths.  The Seed cones can remain attached within the crown of the tree for several years after maturing.


Image Citations (Photos 1, 2 & 3): Chris Evans, University of Illinois, Bugwood.org


Meet more trees on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com  or follow our blog http://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

Meet The "Avocado" Tree - Persea americana

Posted on August 17, 2016 at 1:15 PM Comments comments (0)

The Avocado - Persea americana - tree is a very desirable ornamental, native only to the subtropical areas of Mexico and Central America. The growing conditions must be It's fruit is often included on the seemingly growing list of "super foods", it is very high in vitamin K & B and also contains C, D & Potassium. High Avocado intake was shown in one study to lower blood cholesterol levels.



 

 

With an average height of just 65 feet, it is a medium sized grower. When planted in pots it is necessary to re-pot quite often as they quickly outgrow small areas. The leaves are an elongated oval shape, deep green in color with a slight sheen on the top. The fruits are either pear or egg shaped with green skin that can range from mid green to almost a black-green and pale green inside. Avocado skin, bark and pits are harmful to many animals and have been recorded to cause severe reactions to dogs, cats, cattle and rabbits. The meat of the Avocado is smooth in texture and is often compared to butter in flavor. It is very often used in Vegetarian cuisine as a meat substitute because of it's high fat content. It is also commonly used in California Rolls, Guacamole, Sandwiches, Salads, Soups and Sauces. Commercially in the United States, Haas Avocados are the most known/marketed type even thought there are dozen of other cultivars grown worldwide.

Image Citations (Photos 1-3): Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org

 

Avocado fruits are climacteric, meaning they mature on the tree but don't ripen until taken off. They will only ripen if mature, so if picked early the ripening process will not occur. The Banana is another fruit in the climacteric catagory. Most Avocado crops produce the best crops bi-annually with poor yeilds in the off or in between years. Once off of the tree the fruit will ripen within a two week period, if left on the tree to long the fruit will eventually fall off on it's own. Avocados can be grown from seed, although it will take the new plantings 4-6 years to mature and bear fruit. Indoors you can also grow Avocados from the pits in water, holding them near the surface with toothpicks, once the stem reaches an inch or two you can transfer it to soil.

 

Meet More Trees www.ArundelTreeService.com or www.MeetATree.com

The Rubber Tree - Hevea brasiliensis

Posted on February 16, 2016 at 2:25 PM Comments comments (0)

The Rubber Tree - Hevea brasiliensis, is also called Sharinga Tree, Rubberwood or Para Rubber Tree. It was only originally found growing in the Amazon Rainforest but was planted in more widespread tropical and sub-tropical areas once the demand for it's naturally produced rubber increased. This tree is a member of the Euphorbiaceae family and has major economic value because of it's milky latex that naturally occurs within the tree. Recorded uses of this and similar tree rubber/latex products date back to the Olmec people of Mesoamerica some 3600 years ago. By the late 1800's rubber plantations were established in the British colonies, Java, and Malaya. Today most rubber plantations outside of the native region occur in tropical portions of South/East Asia and West Africa. Cultivating in South America has not been satisfactory because of leaf blight this leaf blight is a major concern for plantations worldwide as it has not been cured or corrected and is thought to pose a threat to all varieties/clones growing today.

 

 


Image Citation: David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

 

This latex that occurs in the Rubber Tree is the primary source of natural rubber, it occurs in vessels within the bark just outside of the phloem. The vessels spirals up and around the tree in a right handed helix pattern forming an angle of about 30 degrees and occurring at heights of up to 45 feet. In the wild the tree has been found to reach heights upwards of 100 feet, but this is not very common. Trees grow at a much slower rate once they are tapped for latex and are generally cut down after about thirty years as they usually stop producing at this point so they no longer have economical value. When harvesting cuts are made in the vessels but only deep enough to tap into them without harming the trees growth. In order to grow these trees require tropical or sub-tropical climates, with no chance of frost. One simple frost event can completely wipe out a plantation and be detrimental to production as the rubber becomes brittle and breaks. Latex production is not very reliable the amount and quality is variable from tree to tree. When a tree is tapped (the process is called rubber tapping) the latex is collected in small buckets and looks almost similar to the process used to collect syrup from Maple trees.

 

Meet More Trees on our website: www.ArundelTreeService.com or Follow our Blog: www.MeetATree.com

Meet the "Miracle Tree" - Moringa oleifera

Posted on February 4, 2016 at 11:50 AM Comments comments (0)

Moringa oleifera is the most common of all of the Moringa genus.  The Moringa are the only members of the Moringaceae family.  Moringa oleifera has many common names such as the Miracle Tree (for the high nutrient content and said healing powers), Horseradish Tree (for the root flavor, often compared to horseradish), Drumstick Tree (for the slender seedpods) , Benoil and Benzoil Tree (for the oils derived from the seeds).  

Acording to tradition in parts of Africa (especially Ghana), the "Miracle Tree" and it's products have been used for generations.  The leaves are extremely high in nutrient value and are said to have natural healing powers.  The seed pods and leaves are eaten as a vegetable in many native areas and are used as an ingredient in herbal medicines.  Not only does the Moringa oleifera's products contain high nutrient values it can also be used for water purification purposes.


Image Citation: Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org

This fast growing deciduous tree can reach a height of 32-40 feet with a diameter of just 1.5 feet.  The whitish-grey bark is surrounded by a thick cork.  The young shoots have purplish or greenish-white hairy bark.  The open crown contains drooping, fragile branches and leathery tripinnate leaves.   The fragrant flowers are bisexual and contain five unequal yellow-white petals.  In cooler regions the flowers only appear once a year in April-June, however in warmer regions with high rainfall they can appear twice a year or even year round.  They appear on hairy stalks in spreading clusters that are 10-25 cm long.  The fruit occurs in brown three sided capsules containing dark brown seeds winged seeds that are dispersed by wind and water.  When cultivated as a crop it is cut back annually to allow the pods and leaved to remain within reach.


Image Citation: Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org

 

The Moringa oleifera is the main focus of Moringa Connect, a program that provides registered farmers with seeds and resulting manure for crop expansion and harvesting purposes.  It is also planted as part of the Feed The Future program, Feed The Future is a United States Government Global Hunger & Food Security Initiative that is currently focused in 19 countries.  These programs along with the help of volunteers (including Peace Corp Members, Private and Corporate Sectors) allow areas that are otherwise void of reliable / nutritional food sources to be planted with a resource that will continually produce and reproduce to provide nutritional food for generations to come.  

To learn more about how you can volunteer or donate to these amazing programs (Moringa Connect or Feed The Future) visit  http://moringaconnect.com/  or http://www.feedthefuture.gov/


You can also meet more trees at www.ArundelTreeService.com or Follow Our Blog www.MeetATree.com

Arbor Day Foundation's - Hazelnut Project

Posted on January 26, 2016 at 10:30 AM Comments comments (0)

The Arbor Day Foundation has been working for 20 years to perfect the Hazelnut and create a superior variety that not only produces delicious and nutritious nuts but also offers disease resistance and tolerance of the wide range of growth conditions the United States provides. In 1996, The Hazelnut Project began with nine acres and the planting of roughly 5200 juvenile bushes made up of 60 different hybridized Hazelnuts near the Lied Lodge at The Arbor Day Farm in Nebraska. By 2005 they had gained assistance from more then 50,000 charter patrons nationwide who had agreed to plant, observe and report progress of their own bushes. By 2012 new seedlings were propagated using a combination of the best performers from the originally distributed plants, patron grown nuts and even some plantings found in the wild. Now in 2016, there is hope that even better hybrids will continue to develop over time and the plants will be become stronger and more hardy.

 


Image Citation: Richard Webb, Bugwood.org

 

Hazelnuts are considered by many as a super food, their rich complex buttery flavor allows them to not only be eaten alone but also pair well with many other foods. They are high in dietary fiber, Vitamin E, magnesium, potassium, antioxidants, phytonutrients, and Vitamin B. Studies have found that the consumption of just 1.5 ounces of Hazelnuts per day may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. They contain mainly mono-unsaturated fats which are the heart healthy and no cholesterol they are a heart healthy smack. The Hazelnut crops appear in the late summer, replacing the delicate red blossoms.

 

Hazelnut bushes are considered to be woody agriculture, this means that they help slow climate change by providing oxygen and offsetting the build up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The plants are capable of capturing solar energy, which makes them photosynthetically efficient. They are deep, rapid rooting and can live for up to 80 years. They begin producing crops as early as 2-3 years after planting. Hazelnut shells can be used as a safe and efficient fuel alternative which can lead to a reduced demand for wood and other energy sources.


Image Citation: Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

 

How can you help? You can support The Hazelnut Project or any of Arbor Day's other programs by visiting their website and making a donation or becoming a member today. www.ArborDay.org