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Arundel Tree Service

All Aspects Of Tree Care

(410)439-1900

Maryland Licensed Tree Experts

Meet A Tree - Blog

Meet A Tree - Blog

Our Blog includes many interesting tree facts, educational information, tree care tips and a "Meet A Tree" Section that features a different tree at least once a week.  We try to post daily to keep things fresh and inspire you to love trees as much as we do!


Thank you for visiting, we hope you will enjoy what you find here on these pages.


Arundel Tree Service



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Chapman Oak - Quercus chapmanii

Posted on 15 April, 2021 at 13:00 Comments comments (0)

Chapman Oak - Quercus chapmanii, is a deciduous or semi-evergreen shrub or small tree that reach heights of up to 40 feet tall but usually only average about 30 feet. A member of the Fagaceae family, in the Genus Quercus. The crown of the Chapman Oak is most often spreading with contorted branches and oblong leaves with wavy margins. It is considered to have a xeric habit, meaning it does not require excessive or constant amounts of water to grow or favors a drought habitat. The Chapman Oak prefers Sandy dunes and pinelands and can be found growing from 0-100 m along coastal zones from The Carolinas Georgia and Florida (reported to be also established in Kansas)

 

In appearance the Chapman Oak is similar to most other Oaks. The leaves are alternate, simply shaped, oblong or obovate, thick and leathery with wavy margins on the entire leaf, a dark green upper surface and paler dull lower surface. The fruit is in the form of an acorn with a shallow cup and deep nut, knobby scales and gray-yellow color. The bark is brown, scaly and flaking, similar to many White Oaks. The flower occurring in late winter or early spring is small in size and white-tan in color. Recommended for hardiness zones 8-10b, the Chapman Oak prefers full sun to partial shade and alkaline or acidic soil. Small mammals, butterflies and birds all feed on and/or use the Chapman Oak as shelter.

 

 

 

Meet more trees on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog https://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

Sugar Maple - Acer saccharum

Posted on 31 March, 2021 at 0:40 Comments comments (0)

The Sugar Maple - Acer saccharum (also called Hard Maple, or Rock Maple in certain regions) is a deciduous tree that is well known for it's lovely vibrant fall coloring, large size, larger leaves and winged fruit. Growing in an upright erect form, generally with one single trunk, the Sugar Maple makes for a lovely focal point in any setting. It is Native to much of the Eastern portion of North America from Nova Scotia, Ontario and North Dakota, South from Georgia, Northern Alabama, Northern Louisiana, and Eastern Oklahoma. It slightly overlaps the Southern Sugar Maple in range in the Southern most growth areas only (LA, GA, & AL). The Sugar Maple is a slow growing, long lived tree with specimens recorded as old as 400 years. Commonly found as a tree of importance in various Eastern Forest types including, Hemlock/Northern hardwoods, Beech/Sugar Maple, Sugar Maple/Basswood, Cherry/Maple, and Red Spruce/Sugar Maple.

 

The bark of the Sugar Maple is smooth and Gray when young, becoming irregularly furrowed, scaled and darker with maturity. The leaves are opposite, simple, thin, firm and broader then they are long. Upper leaf surfaces are a dark yellow/green in color, palmately veined with a paler yellow/green or whitened underside. Leaf blades range in size from 7-20 cm long and broad. In the fall the leaves turn a brilliant Red, Yellow or Orange in color. The flowers of the Sugar Maple are tiny they contain 5 sepals that are green/yellow in color, occurring in clusters near the leaf axil in Mid-Late Spring on thin/long drooping stems. The fruit occurs in early Fall in the form of paired samaras that are 2-3 cm long, the pair of samaras almost always forms a U shape where connected.

 

The Sugar Maple is a very popular tree and can be found at almost any nursery in hardiness zones 3-8. It can be grown as both a shade tree and an ornamental, be careful when planting this tree as although it is a slow grower it will get very large with age 65-75 feet tall and 40-50 feet broad (canopy). The Sugar Maple prefers partial shade or full sun and deep, well-drained, acidic to slightly alkaline soil. Sugar Maple also has a moderate drought tolerance. Sugar Maples are commonly browsed upon by Whitetail Deer, Squirrels, Moose and Snowshoe Hares. Sugar Maple is the Official State tree of New York, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Vermont (more states than any other tree).

 

 

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Corkwood - Leiterneria floridana

Posted on 30 March, 2021 at 0:35 Comments comments (0)

The Leitneriaceae Family currently only contains one single species, the Corkwood Leiterneria floridana. The Corkwood is a very sporadically distributed species found only in Northern Florida, Southeastern Texas, Eastern Arkansas and the far Southeastern region of Missouri. It is most commonly found growing in swamp areas, depressions, ponds, roadside ditches or bordering tidal marshes. It is easily recognized in it's native regions by it's very upright form combined with elliptical leaves, catkins, and tan colored lenticels found within the red-brown bark. The Leitneriaceae florida is included on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as a "Near Threatened/Lower Risk" species because of its very small number (limited by a very small native range), thought they do not show a significant decline in the population. Leiterneria floridana was only first discovered in 1835, in the saline marshes of Florida where the Apalachicola River empties into the Gulf of Mexico.

 

The Corkwood is a small deciduous tree or shrub that only averages 15 feet in height at maturity. Corkwoods always grow in a very upright form and generally have one single straight trunk with a narrow crown containing very few branches. The leaves appear in alternately in simple narrow elliptical form. The upper portions of each leaf is lustrous, leathery and medium green in color, while the lower surface is a more dull pale green. The leaves have fine hairs on the surface when young, becoming hairless when mature. The foliage is among the most persistent of the deciduous autumn leaves, remaining green till late November (in the more northern portions of it's range), then becoming greenish-yellow. The flowers are unisex with male and female flowers on separate plants. The male flowers appear in upright grey-brown catkins that are 2-5 cm long, while the female appear in reddish catkins that are 1-2 cm long. The fruit occurs in a single seeded ellipsoid drupe that is yellow-brown in color. The wood of the Corkwood is very fitting to it's name as it is extremely lightweight. The wood is often compared to balsa wood and can be used in similar applications. Corkwood is the lightest weight of all of the native Eastern North American trees. Portions of the trunk/stems have even been used to craft fishing floats.

 

The Corkwood - Leiterneria floridana is not the same as the shrub also commonly known as Corkwood - Stillingia aquatica (of the Euphorbiaceae family). The genus, Corkwood Leiterneria floridana is thought by many researchers to be related to the similarly pollenated quassia family (Simaroubaceae), though they retain very unique and identifiable features that easily separate the two.

 

In Italy a single compressed endocarp was collected from the Villa San Faustino site in Italy. This single specimen shows that until the Early Pleistoncene period Leitneria venosa grew there. Leitnera is also listed as a species found within the early Pliocene San Gimiginiano flora. Several other similar endocarps have been found on other sites in Northern Italy dating all the way up to the Cenozoic period, though rare. These fossils shows that the Leiterneria family was not always made up of this one single species but had other members with possibly a greater range then the Leiterneria floridana.

 

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Horse Chestnut

Posted on 12 March, 2021 at 23:30 Comments comments (8)

The Horse Chestnut - Aesculus hippocastanum, is only native to a very small area of Mountains between Greece and Albania- it was not discovered/recorded until 1596. Once discovered it was rapidly planted and spread almost all over Europe in the early 1600's, then later by the early colonists of North America. It is a very common street tree from Ontario to Virginia. In the West it's spread ranges from British Columbia down through New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. It is one of the more common street trees in the United States and has naturalized in most regions. Growing to heights of 50-75 feet at maturity, this tree can live upwards of 300 years so when planted correctly it can be considered a permanent addition to most landscapes. It is recommended to be planted in hardiness zones 4-7

 

 

 

The name Horse Chestnut was thought to gain it's origin from the false belief that this tree was part of the Chestnut family, combined with the fact that despite the fruits being poisonous to horses they actually cured some chest related ailments when eaten by sick horses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Citations (Photos 1 & 2):Norbert Frank, University of West Hungary, Bugwood.org

 

Although the Horse Chestnut is sometimes confused with the closley related American Buckeye, that name is generally reserved for the North American members of the Aesculus genus. The Horse Chestnut differs from the American Buckeyes because of it's shiny orange-brown terminal buds, bigger leaves on stalkless leaflets, 1 foot tall heads with predominently white flowers and very prickly husks that enclose the mahogany colored seeds. Each individual flower opens to reveal a bright splash of yellow at the base of every petal, once pollinated this yellow turns a deeper orange and then finally a crimson red.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Citations (Photos 3 & 4) :Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

 

The flowers provide a rich source of nectar and pollen to insects, especially bees. Caterpillars of the triangle moth and horse chestnut leaf miner moth feed on the leaves. Deer and other mammals eat the conkers. The most famous use of Horse Chestnut is in the game of conkers. The first record of the game is from the Isle of Wight in 1848.

The wood of the Horse Chestnut is soft and often considered weak. It has a very straight light colored grain and is often used for wood turning, artificial limb production and wooden toy making. This weakness can be considered a liability as mature trees in full leaf have been known to drop large branches without warning during heavy storms.

 

 

 

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Quaking Aspen - Populus tremuloides

Posted on 1 March, 2021 at 23:30 Comments comments (0)

The Quaking Aspen - Populus tremuloides - is also called the Trembling Aspen, Golden Aspen or Mountain Aspen. With the smallest of breezes the leaves will flutter hence it's name. When fluttering the leaves even making an audible sound which would explain why the Onondagas called it the "nut-kie-e" which means noisy leaf. This tree has a very remarkable native range covering a majority of the Northern portion of the continent, ranging from New Foundland South to Delaware in the East and along the Coast of Alaska and British Columbia running South through the Rocky Mountains. Although it is not found in the South it does have one of the widest distributions of any tree in North America. It can be grown throughout hardiness zones 1-7. It is often times one of the first trees to appear after a Forest Fire. It is a fast grower often gaining 24 inches in a single season. Aspen wood Is used to make a variety of items such as wooden toys, tongue depressors, popsicle sticks, clothes pins, crates and even for paper pulp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Citation (Stand): Dave Powell, USDA Forest Service (retired), Bugwood.org

 

The leaves are rounded triangles with small teeth along the margins. The leaves are a glossy green above and dull below, during the Spring they change to a vivid Yellow or very rarely Red. They are arrranged alternately on the branches. Catkins are long and silvery and appear between April and May. In the late Spring, it's tiny seeds which are enclosed in cottony tufts are dispersed by the wind. The bark is a Greenish-White to Grey in color, it is often marked with black knots or horizontal scars.

 

 

 

 

Image Citation (Stand): Steven Katovich, Bugwood.org

 

The Aspen is a favorited food and shelter source for many different type of wildlife. The leaves and bark are eaten by Deer, Elk and Hare/Rabbits. The Buds are an important food source for Grouse during Winter. Beavers not only feed from the Aspen, they also use it's lumber as a building material. Many different birds and butterflies make their homes in these stands.

 

The Aspen holds the the title of largest living organisms on Earth, growing in clones/stand that reproduce primarily by sending up sprouts from their roots. For the most part each clone within a stand is connected to the next one through it's root system. One clone/stand in Utah (where it is the State tree) has been determined to have over 47,000 stems, this stand is estimated to weigh over 6,000 tons! While individually each stem lives 100-150 years, Aspen stands are one of the longest living organisms. One clone in Minnesota is estimated to be 8,000 years old, making it one of the longest living organism on Earth.

 

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Swamp Chestnut Oak

Posted on 28 February, 2021 at 23:25 Comments comments (0)

The Swamp Chestnut Oak - Quercus michauxii, is a medium to large sized deciduous tree that reaches heights of only 40 feet on average but can grow as tall as 100 feet tall in it's ideal settings (well drained alluvial floodplains). Regardless of the overall height and site location the crown remains compact.

 

The leaves of this tree range in size from 4-8 inches long. The leaf blades are leathery in textured and diamond shaped with the widest portions being located two third of the way to the tip of each leaf. Each leaf is coarsely toothed on all sides in a wavy fashion. The leaf surfaces are dark green and smooth while the bottom downy and paler in color. The bark patterns of the Swamp Chestnut Oak vary and can be tight with shallow parallel ridges/valleys or have long peeling side strips. The bark of the tree differs in color depending on the location, it is lighter gray in upland settings and dark gray in lowlands. The acorns of the Swamp Chestnut Oak are 1 inch long and light brown in color and sweet to the taste.

 

It is very hard to differentiate between the Swamp Chestnut Oak, Chinkapin Oak and White Oak as they share many of the same characteristics. Swamp Chestnut Oak grows best in low lying bottomlands that periodically flood whereas the other two grow best in well drained soils.

 

The lumber from the Swamp Chestnut Oak is grouped with other White Oaks during lumber production. It can be used in almost any application from tools to furniture to baskets. The lumber has a very nice appearance and can be left natural in many applications.

 

Meet more trees and shrubs on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog https://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/


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