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Meet A Tree - Blog

Our Blog includes many interesting tree facts, educational information, tree care tips and a "Meet A Tree" Section that features a different tree at least once a week.  We try to post daily to keep things fresh and inspire you to love trees as much as we do!


Thank you for visiting, we hope you will enjoy what you find here on these pages.


Arundel Tree Service



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Moringa oleifera - Miracle Tree

Posted on January 9, 2018 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Moringa oleifera is the most common of all of the Moringa genus. The Moringa are the only members of the Moringaceae family. Moringa oleifera has many common names such as the Miracle Tree (for the high nutrient content and said healing powers), Horseradish Tree (for the root flavor, often compared to horseradish), Drumstick Tree (for the slender seedpods) , Benoil and Benzoil Tree (for the oils derived from the seeds).

 

 

 

According to tradition in parts of Africa (especially Ghana), the "Miracle Tree" and it's products have been used for generations. The leaves are extremely high in nutrient value and are said to have natural healing powers. The seed pods and leaves are eaten as a vegetable in many native areas and are used as an ingredient in herbal medicines. Not only does the Moringa oleifera's products contain high nutrient values it can also be used for water purification purposes.

 

 

 

This fast growing deciduous tree can reach a height of 32-40 feet with a diameter of just 1.5 feet. The whitish-grey bark is surrounded by a thick cork. The young shoots have purplish or greenish-white hairy bark. The open crown contains drooping, fragile branches and leathery tripinnate leaves. The fragrant flowers are bisexual and contain five unequal yellow-white petals. In cooler regions the flowers only appear once a year in April-June, however in warmer regions with high rainfall they can appear twice a year or even year round. They appear on hairy stalks in spreading clusters that are 10-25 cm long. The fruit occurs in brown three sided capsules containing dark brown seeds winged seeds that are dispersed by wind and water. When cultivated as a crop it is cut back annually to allow the pods and leaved to remain within reach.

 

 

 

The Moringa oleifera is the main focus of Moringa Connect, a program that provides registered farmers with seeds and resulting manure for crop expansion and harvesting purposes. It is also planted as part of the Feed The Future program, Feed The Future is a United States Government Global Hunger & Food Security Initiative that is currently focused in 19 countries. These programs along with the help of volunteers (including Peace Corp Members, Private and Corporate Sectors) allow areas that are otherwise void of reliable / nutritional food sources to be planted with a resource that will continually produce and reproduce to provide nutritional food for generations to come.

 

 

 

To learn more about how you can volunteer or donate to these amazing programs (Moringa Connect or Feed The Future) visit http://moringaconnect.com/ or http://www.feedthefuture.gov/

 

 

 

You can also meet more trees at www.ArundelTreeService.com or Follow Our Blog www.MeetATree.com

Sugarberry - Celtis laevigata

Posted on January 2, 2018 at 1:00 PM Comments comments (0)

The Sugarberry - Celtis laevigata is a small deciduous tree that grows upwards of 95 feet, they often flower and fruit when young. The Sugarberry grows in an upright erect form with an open spreading crown. The simple bark is grey in color and smooth when young, becoming marred with cork or wart like ridges / growths. The bark marking is often caused by bird excavating the bark to access the sweet sap, this in turn attracts insects to the wounds. The leaves are simple and alternate usually thin and paper like in texture, lanceolate or ocassionally ovate with a rounded, flattened or asymmetric tip. The upper surface is pale green and hairless, smooth surfaced with visible veins.

 

 

 

 

 

Image Citation: Brian Lockhart, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

 

 

 

The Sugarberry is a member of the Cannabaeceae (Hemp) family. Sugarberry is usually found growing in sandy loam or rocky soils along streams, bottom lands, and in woodlands. The Cannabaceae Family is made up of 11 genera and 180 species of shrubs, trees, herbs and vines - 14 species are found in North America only 9 are native others are naturalized. The woody members of this family are most easily identified by their alternate simple leaves with 3 primary veins from the base and inconspicuous flowers, and were originally classified as members of the Elm family (Ulmaceae) but recent studies suggest they should actually be included with the Cannabaeceae family.

 

 

 

 

 

Image Citation: Chris Evans, University of Illinois, Bugwood.org

 

 

 

Sugarberry has long been used for many purposes by a variety of Native American tribes. The Houma used a concentrate made from the bark to treat sore throats and ground up shells to treat venereal diseases. The Comanche would beat the fruits to a pulp and then mixed with animal fat, rolled into balls, and roasted in the fire as food. The Acoma, Navajo, and Tewa all consumed raw Sugarberries for food. The leaves and branches were boiled by the Navajo to make dark brown and red dye for wool.

 

 

 

Meet more trees on our website: www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog: www.MeetATree.com

The Blue Ash - Fraxinus quadrangulata

Posted on January 2, 2018 at 10:40 AM Comments comments (0)

The Blue Ash - Fraxinus quadrangulata is a medium sized deciduous ash tree that is native to the Midwestern portion of the the United States. It is most commonly found from Oklahoma North through Michigan, into the Bluegrass regions of Kentucky and lower Nashville basin of Tennesee. There are also small isolated populations growing in small areas of the Appalachian Mountians, Alabama and Southern Ontario. On average the height at maturity can range from 30 - 85 feet depending on the terrain, location and soil type the tree is growing in.

 

 

 

The twigs of the Blue Ash are unique having four corky ridges that gives them an almost squared appearance when a cross section is cut. The leaves most often are made up of 7 leaflets and average 7 1/2 - 15 inches long, with individual leaflets ranging in size from 2 - 5 inches each. The green leaves are coarsely serrated along the margins with short and distinct petiolules, they become more yellow in the fall. The small purplish flowers occur in the early spring before the leaves appear. The fruit is a Samara that is 1-2 inches long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch broad including the attached wing.

 

 

 

The various products of the Blue Ash have many uses. A blue dye can be extracted from the inner layer of the tree through water immersion. Pioneers used this dye to color yarn and other textiles used for sewing, crocheting, knitting and weaving. The wood can be used to make flooring, baseball bats, tool handles, crates and furniture. The name Blue Ash was also adopted by the City of Blue Ash in Ohio because of the number of trees growing in the area and the great use of the lumber in early buildings throughout the area.

 

 

The Blue Ash has not been as greatly impacted by the Emerald Ash Borer as the other North American Ash species. The beetle has spread throughout most of this trees natural range. When infestation occurs in an area 60-70% of these trees survive, where other Ash trees may on have a survival rate of 1-2%.

 

 

 

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Dawn Redwood - Metasequoia glyptostrobboides

Posted on December 31, 2017 at 10:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Thought to once be extinct until it's rediscovery in 1944, the Dawn Redwood - Metasequoia glyptostrobboides - is the smallest of all Redwoods. Reaching a max recorded height of 200 feet at maturity - it is still a giant tree by normal standards. It is native only to the Hubei province of China, but is now planted widely as an ornamental in both residential and commercial landscape settings. Seeds collected from an expedition performed by the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University were sent in 1948 to all of the botanical institutions that were active at the time. These seeds were planted in 1948-50 and many remain growing in botanical gardens and parks today. The largest specimens remaining from this mass seed planting are (1) at The Bailey Arboretum on Long Island, (2) at James Blair Hall in Willamsburg, VA, (2) near Carnegie Lake in Princeton, NJ, (1) at Willow Wood, NJ, (1) Washington Arboretum in Seattle, (1) at the Los Angeles State and County Arboretum, CA.

 

 

 

Fossils have shown that during the Paleocene and Eocene periods there were vast forests of Dawn Redwood ( and other metasequoia varieties) throughout the northern portion of North America. In Badlands National Park large petrified trunks and stumps of the Metasequoia occidentalis a very similar tree in this same family that is now extinct, make up the major portion of Tertiary fossil plant material in the badlands of western North Dakota. Upon rediscovery the Dawn Redwood was hailed as a living fossil as the taxon was believed to have become extinct during the late Miocene period. This tree is very unique in the fact that it lived along side the Dinosaurs and has survived, a feat that is limited to very living things.

 

 

 

The Dawn Redwood is a fast growing deciduous tree that can grow up to 4 feet in a single year. The leaves are small and feathery and similar in appearance to the Bald Cypress, they are green on top in the Spring changing to and orange to reddish brown in the Fall. It differs from the Bald Cypress in the leaves and shoots being opposite one another, the crown being more open and the individual leaves being larger, broader and opening two months earlier in most areas. Although it is closely related to the Giant Redwoods it is deciduous like the Bald Cypress and often compared to both. It is recommended to be planted in zones 5-8. They make for a great shade tree but be aware when planting that they grow very tall and average 75-100 feet with a spread on average of 25 feet, in most settings. They enjoy full sunlight and grow in a pyramidal shape. Their branches provide great habitat and winter protection for many varities of animal & birds. They are available at some larger nurseries, if you can not find one locally they can also be purchased directly from The Arbor Day Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet More Trees at www.ArundelTreeService.com or www.MeetaTree.com

Arborvitae - Thuja occidentalis

Posted on December 20, 2017 at 9:45 AM Comments comments (1)

Arborvitae - Thuja occidentalis is monoecious evergreen tree that generally reaches heights of 40-50 feet tall, although it has the potential to grow much taller. It is a native northern Cypress with scale like leaves, flattened twigs that are grouped in fan shaped sprays with bilaterally symmetric cones. Found mostly on limestone - derived soils, in swamp areas, riparian areas on cliff and talus from 0-900 m. It is common from Ontario and New Brunswick in the north, south through the Appalachians of North Carolina and Tennessee. It is also commonly called Northern White Cedar, American Arborvitae, Eastern Arborvitae, or Cedar Blanc.



Image Citation: Richard Webb, Bugwood.org

 

The bark of the Arborvitae is Red-Brown in color and becomes gray with age. The bark is thin and fibrous becoming fissured and forming long strips with age. The pollen cones are 1-2 mm long reddish in color. The seed cones are ovoid 9-14 mm long, green maturing to brown with 2 pairs of woody, fertile scales, each one is longer then it is wide. The leaves are scale like, flattened 1-4 mm long, 1-2 mm wide, pointed and dull yellow-green on the upper and lower surface with visible glands and lateral leaves near twig tips.


Image Citation: Franklin Bonner, USFS (ret.), Bugwood.org


It is written that in 1536 an extract from the foliage of the Arborvitae saved the lives of Jacques Cartier and his crew who were suffering from scurvy during their second discovery voyage to Canada, they in turn named the tree Arborvitae which is Latin for "tree of life". They brought the tree home with them to Europe, making it the first North American tree to be introduced to Europe. Since that time, there have been more then 120 cultivars discovered and named. This sheer number makes it one of the most popular trees in horticulture today. Arborvitae is one of the longest lived trees in Eastern North America, it can live up to 1890 years.


Image Citation: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org


Arborvitae is a very common planting in both residential and commercial settings. It is recommended for hardiness zones 3-7 and holds it foliage year round. This tree adapts very well to both shearing and shaping and naturally grows in a pyramidal shape.


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"Southern Magnolia" - Magnolia grandiflora

Posted on November 27, 2017 at 11:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The "Southern Magnolia" - Magnolia grandiflora - is a medium sized evergreen tree. It is also called the Bull Bay, Big Laurel, Evergreen Magnolia or Large Flower Magnolia. The native range of the Southern Magnolia goes from North Carolina south down the Atlantic Coast and through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Central Texas. Averaging 60-80 feet tall in ideal locations, they usually reach maturity at 80-120 years. It typically grows in an oval pyramidal shape.

 

Featuring leathery leaves 5–10" in length, with a lustrous dark green top and soft, rusty underside. The large White fragrant flowers appear April-June and are almost perfect in form. The fleshy cone shaped fruit mature in late fall. The fruit are 5-8 inches long and attract a wide range of wildlife including Squirrels, Rabbits and Birds.

 

Recommended for zones 6-10 this variety can be grown as far North as Maine and is found planted over most of the country with the exception of the North-Central Region. Air-layering, stem cuttings and grafting are all sucessful means of propagation. It can be found at most nurseries in it's growth range. It is best planted as a landscape tree versus a street tree as the leaf, flower and fruit debris are often considered messy.

 

The name Magnolia honors French Botanist Pierre Magnol, who was so impressed with the tree he transplanted one near his home in Europe over 300 years ago. One of these trees grows on the White House grounds, it was transplanted by President Andrew Jackson from his home in Nashville, Tennessee. This tree was transplanted to honor his late wife Rachel's memory.

 

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The Java Plum - Syzygium cumini

Posted on November 24, 2017 at 11:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The Java Plum - Syzygium cumini, Is a fast growing evergreen tree that reaches heights of 30-80 feet tall depending on the location/conditions planted. It is considered a tropical tree and is a member of the flowering plant family Myrtaceae. It grows in an erect single trunk they could be straight or crooked in form with a rounded crown. The tree was introduced to Florida in 1911 by the USDA, it originated from Asia, specifically India and Burma. It has become established in Maritime hammocks, lake margins, flatwoods and rockland throughout Central and Southern Florida. It is similar to the Malabar Plum Syzygium jambos but can be distinguished by the different sized leaves and fruit. It is treated by the state of Florida as an invasive species. It can be found growing from Sea Level to 6000 feet above in the tropics. It grows best in areas with very high rain or humidity levels.

 

The leaves of the Java Plum are opposite, simple, thick, leathery, elliptic or oblong in shape with a rounded base and tip. The upper surface of the leaves are lustrous and dark green in color with visible yellow lateral veins, the lower surface is a yellow-green in color and duller in sheen. Leaf blades are 7-18 cm long and 3-10 cm broad with a light yellow petiole of 5-25 mm long. The leaves are said to smell similar to turpentine when crushed. The flowers are individually small in size only reaching 7 mm long, with 4 petals, fused in a rounded cap that opens and exposes a mass of white or pink threadlike stamens. The flowers are produced in clusters 5-6cm long on the wood of the previous year. Flowers on the Java Plum occur year round. The fruit is fleshy with a single seed, it occurs as a oblong or ellipsoid berry that is 1-2.5 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. When young the fruit is green becoming pink, red and then a purple-black. The fruit matures year round the same as the flowers. The pulp ranges from purple to white and is very juicy, with a sweet flavor in high quality varieties to astringent flavor in poorer varieties.

 

 


 

The products of the Java Plum are used for various purposes. The fruit is used to make wine and vinegar, they are also a high source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C. The fruit seeds are used in alternate healing processes, Unani and Chinese Medicine (digestive ailments) and Ayurveda (diabetes control).

 

Meet more trees on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog http://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santa Maria - Calophyllum antillanum

Posted on November 23, 2017 at 11:20 AM Comments comments (0)

Santa Maria - Calophyllum antillanum, is most easily recognized by the combination of oval leaves with numerous closely set parallel veins and deeply pitted, diamond-patterned bark. It is an evergreen tree, salt tolerant tree that originated in the West Indies but has become naturalized in South Florida. This plant is considered to be invasive to mangrove forests and inland hammocks. It is similar to the Alexandrian Laurel which is also naturalized in Florida but is distinguished by it's bisexual flowers with 200-300 stamens and fruit that is 2.5 - 4 cm long. It is a member of the Clusianceae / Garcinia Family.

 

The Santa Maria grows in an erect fashion, generally with a single trunk occasionally with multiple low branches. The bark is dark gray or nearly black, deeply ridged or furrowed. The leaves are simple, opposite, thick, elliptic or oval in shape with a rounded (occasionally notched) tip. The 5-8 cm long leaf surface is lustrous and dark green in color with numerous visible veins that are located very close to one another. The fruit occurs as a rounded drupe that is 2-2.5 cm long and yellow or brown at maturity. The flower is uni-sexual averaging 2.5 cm in diameter, fragrant with four white lobes and 40-50 stamens each.

 

The wood of the Santa Maria is used in tropics (not in the United States), the heartwood varies from yellow-pink to red-brown in color, the sapwood is lighter in color. The grain interlocks and has gravity ranges from .51 to .57. The wood is considered to be easy to work with and is considered above average when rated for shaping and sanding but not for turning and boring. Santa Maria wood can be used for general construction, flooring, furniture, cabinet making, poles, cross ties and handles.

 

 

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The Common Hackberry - celtis occidentalis

Posted on November 22, 2017 at 10:45 AM Comments comments (0)

The Common Hackberry - celtis occidentalis, is a deciduous tree or sometimes large shrub. It grows primarily in an erect upright fashion with a single trunk and low branching, rounded, broad crown. The branching habit of the Hackberry can range from slender and horizontal to zig-zag or irregular. It is native to stream banks, flood plains, wooded hillsides and often found in areas that are moist from 0-1800 m. In the North they can be found from Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Maine, in the South from North Carolina, Georgia and Alabama, West through Wyoming, Colorado, Arkansas, Northern Oklahoma and Northern Texas.

 

Most easily recognized by the combination of alternate, simply shaped leaves that are 3-14 cm long and coarsely toothed and the hard rounded single stoned drupe. The bark is light brown ans silvery gray, divided into narrow ridges with corky wart like growths. The leaves are alternate, simple, thin, leathery and either broadly ovate, ovate-lanceolate or triangular in shape. The leaf tips are usually abruptly pointed and the edges are coarsely toothed from mid-blade to the tip. The upper leaf surface is light green or blue-green and the lower is a paler green. The flower is greenish in color and tiny, 5 sepals and absent of petals, found in the Spring growing solitary on the axils of the upper leaves. The fruit is an ellipsoid or rounded single stoned orange-red or purple drupe, with a cream colored stone, maturing in the Fall and shriveling but persisting through winter.

 

The Hackberry is recommended for hardiness zones 3-9 and is considered both a shade tree and an ornamental. On average the Hackberry reaches heights of 40-60 feet tall and the same broad, maximum recorded heights are upwards of 115 feet tall. It is a fast grower and can gain 12-24 inches in height per year. Hackberry fruit is a popular food for Winter Birds including the Cedar Waxwing, Mockingbird and Robin. The tree also is very attractive to many butterfly species including, Comma, Hackberry, Mourning Cloak, Tawny Emperor, Question Mark, and American Snout.

 

Meet more trees at www.ArundelTreeService.com or http://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

 

 

 

Turkey Oak - Quercus laevis

Posted on November 17, 2017 at 11:10 AM Comments comments (0)

The Turkey Oak - Quercus laevis is most easily identified by the small stature in combination with it's twisted petioles, some leaves that are tri-lobed almost resembling a turkey footprint and dry sandy habitat. It is a small deciduous that grows in a typically upright fashion with a narrow crown. It is native to deep, well drained sandy ridges and sunny hammocks. The trees growth range is limited to only Virginia to Louisiana and Florida. The Turkey Oak covers over 9-10 million acres of land in Florida. It is very similar in appearance to the Southern Red Oak.

 

The bark is dark gray to nearly black in color with vertical ridges. The leaves are alternate and simply shaped, broadly elliptic, with 3-7 lobes each. Upper surface lustrous yellow-green, hairless, lower surface varies from pale green to a rust color. In the fall the leaves become scarlet-red or almost brown in color. Named for some of the tri-lobed leaves that resemble a Turkey foot.

 

The Turkey Oak is not commercially grown as it is not important because of it's size, but it is close grained, hard and heavy. It is recommended for hardiness zones 6-9. The wood is considered excellent fuel and is used very widely as firewood. The bark and twigs contain valuable materials for tanning leather.

 

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Using wood chips in your garden - "Back to Eden Organic Gardening"

Posted on November 6, 2017 at 11:40 AM Comments comments (2)

Ever wonder how freshly ground wood chips can benefit your gardens at home.  Check out this documentary on the benefits of using wood chips in your organic gardens.  Not only to they help provide you with improved soil conditions but they help conserve water.   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rPPUmStKQ4" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rPPUmStKQ4


The Sour Orange - Citrus x aurantium

Posted on November 6, 2017 at 8:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The Sour Orange - Citrus x aurantium is a small evergreen shrub or small tree that reaches heights of only 10-30 feet tall. The Sour Orange has been naturalized in Florida, Georgia and Texas, but originated in southeastern Asia and South Sea Islands (Fiji, Samoa, and Guam). Sour Orange is grown in orchards settings only in the Orient/various other parts of the world where its special products are of commercial importance, including southern Europe and some offshore islands of North Africa, the Middle East, Madras, India, West Tropical Africa, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Brazil and Paraguay.

 

 

Image Citation: NCSC Herbarium, Citrus ID, USDA APHIS ITP, Bugwood.org

 

The leaves of the Sour Orange are simply shaped ovate or elliptic, lustrous and deep green in color. The flowers are small, white in color and usually have 4 or 5 petals. The fruit is orange in color, round in shape with a thick almost leathery rind. Inside of the fruit is several separate sections or cells, each having at least a single seed. The fruit is fragrant, however it is generally too sour to be eaten on it's own. The primary use of Sour Orange is for the production of marmalade. The fruits are largely exported to England and Scotland for making marmalade.

 

 

Image Citation: NCSC Herbarium, Citrus ID, USDA APHIS ITP, Bugwood.org

 

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Meet The Major Oak of Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire, England

Posted on October 31, 2017 at 11:00 AM Comments comments (0)

There is a very unique English Oak tree (Quercus Robur) growing in Sherwood Forest near the small village of Edwinstowe, Nottinghamshire, England which is rumored to be where Robin Hood and his men would hide out, in it's hollow trunk sections. It is called the Major Oak and is estimated to be between 800 - 1000 years old. In 2014 it was even crowned "England's Tree of the Year", because of this honor it will represent England in the running for the "European Tree of the Year" against entries from both Wales and Scotland.

Image Citation: www.RobinofSherwood.org

 

Major Oak was not always the name this tree was called. It has also be recorded as the Queen Oak, and the Cockpen Tree. The current name "Major Oak", originated from Major Hayman Rooke's very popular book about the ancient Oaks of Sherwood Forest from 1790.

Estimated to weigh around 23 tons, it has a diameter of over 33 feet and a crown spread of 92 feet - it is claimed ot be the largest Oak tree in all of England.  The Major Oak has been in a conservation status since the early 1900's. When visiting the tree today you will find a fence surrounding the base of the tree which serves as protection for it's roots and truck from foot traffic. During the Edwardian period there were chains used to support the branches and lead sheets around the trunk, these were replaced in the 1970's by wooden supports, which were replaced by the steel support rods that remain in place today.

 

From the Sherwood Forest Visitor Center you are a 10-15 minute walk from this Majestic Old Major Oak. The visitor center is open daily (the hours vary by season) and allows you to explore not just the Major Oak but the 450 acre forest that is home to an estimated 900+ veteran Oak trees. If that is not enough to draw you in there is also an Annual Robin Hood Festival in August that celebrates the Legendary Home of Robin Hood and his Men.

 

To learn about other Destination Trees visit our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or our blog www.MeetATree.com


 

The Fleshy Hawthorn - Crataegus succulenta

Posted on October 24, 2017 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

The Fleshy Hawthorn - Crataegus succulenta, is a deciduous thicket forming shrub or small tree that reaches heights of only 12-20 feet tall. Generally growing in an erect or clumping habit with single or multiple trunks and compound thorns, it is native to North American and can be found growing along streams, rivers, pastures, open woodlands, mountain slopes, ridges from British Columbia and Quebec in the North on South through Iowa, Missouri, Ohio, Arkansas, the Appalachians, Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina.

 

 


Image Citation: Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

 

Considered to be the most widespread Hawthorn in all of North America, the Fleshy Hawthorn is best recognized by the combination of narrowly winged, nonglandular petiole, thick doubly toothed leaves, and long stout thorns. The leaves of the Fleshy Hawthorn are alternate, simply shaped, thick and firm to the touch, obovate, ovate or broadly elliptic with distinct margins and shallow lobes. The upper leaf surface is lustrous and hairless when mature, the lower surface is paler in color and more dull in finish. The flower of the Fleshy Hawthorn is 1.2 - 1.7 cm in diameter with white circular petals, 20 stamens and red-pink anthers. Flowering occurs in late Spring to early Summer annually. The fruit is in the form of a Pome, bright red in color and lustrous, ranging in size from 6-12 mm in diameter, maturing in the Fall.

 

 


Image Citation: Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

 

Meet more trees on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog http://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/

 

Fleshy Hawthorn - Crataegus succulenta

Posted on October 24, 2017 at 10:35 AM Comments comments (0)

The Fleshy Hawthorn - Crataegus succulenta, is a deciduous thicket forming shrub or small tree that reaches heights of only 12-20 feet tall.  Generally growing in an erect or clumping habit with single or multiple trunks and compound thorns, it is native to North American and can be found growing along streams, rivers, pastures, open woodlands, mountain slopes, ridges from British Columbia and Quebec in the North on South through Iowa, Missouri, Ohio, Arkansas, the Appalachians, Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina. 


Image Citation: Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

Considered to be the most widespread Hawthorn in all of North America, the Fleshy Hawthorn is best recognized by the combination of narrowly winged, nonglandular petiole, thick doubly toothed leaves, and long stout thorns.  The leaves of the Fleshy Hawthorn are alternate, simply shaped, thick and firm to the touch, obovate, ovate or broadly elliptic with distinct margins and shallow lobes.  The upper leaf surface is lustrous and hairless when mature, the lower surface is paler in color and more dull in finish.  The flower of the Fleshy Hawthorn is 1.2 - 1.7 cm in diameter with white circular petals, 20 stamens and red-pink anthers.  Flowering occurs in late Spring to early Summer annually.  The fruit is in the form of a Pome, bright red in color and lustrous, ranging in size from 6-12 mm in diameter, maturing in the Fall.  


Image Citation: Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org


Meet more trees on our website www.ArundelTreeService.com or follow our blog http://arundeltreeservice.meetatree.com/




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